Cattle driving the UK, England
Europe

Explore the United Kingdom on horseback

The United Kingdom: a green land of dramatic landscapes, rough wilderness and hidden stone villages. Explore on horseback little trodden paths and some of the most scenic riding trails in the country, passing through historic villages and over rolling hills. With Equus Journeys, discover the spectacular British Isles on trail rides or centre-based holidays.
See all our trips

From the horse’s mouth

  • The Great Dartmoor crossing
    May 2019 Robert Jeff
    Excellent excursion. Vigorous romp across spectral Dartmoor on muscular working horses, spelled by sojourns in flavorful inns and pubs. The most significant factors, apart from the innate appeal of Dartmoor, are, first, the quality of the horses and, second, the lack of regimentation. We were invited to pass at will,... Read all
    More about this trip
  • Dartmoor riding holiday in England
    Ride across the moors of Devon in England
  • Riding trail through Dartmoor in Devon
    Explore the lovely British countryside on horseback
  • Dartmoor riding holidays in England
    Ride across Dartmoor on well-behaved horses
  • Wild ponies in Devon, England
    Spot the occasional herd of wild ponies

Visa & Health

Formalities

USA: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages/UnitedKingdom.html
Your passport must be valid for duration of your stay (six months remaining validity recommended).
Tourist visa not required for stays under 90 days

CANADA: https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/united-kingdom
Canadians must present a passport to visit the United Kingdom, which must be valid for at least the expected duration of their stay in that country. This requirement may also apply when travelling to Northern Ireland from other parts of the United Kingdom, and vice versa. Prior to travelling, ask your transportation company about its requirements related to passport validity, which may be more stringent than the country's entry rules.
Tourist visa: Not required (for stays of six months or less)






Health

Good medical care is widely available. You may be required to pay medical fees in advance. Make sure you have travel insurance that covers all medical expenses in case of illness or injury (including hospitalization abroad and medical evacuation).
You can dial 999 to reach either the police, fire and ambulance departments.
Along the coastal areas, this number will also put you in touch with Britain’s voluntary coastguard rescue service, the Royal National Lifeboat Institute.
Calls are free from any public or private phone, but they should be made only in real emergencies.
Read more at https://www.visitbritain.com/gb/en/plan-your-trip/en-caso-de-emergencia#7jbHxflZxGce9mVR.99

Insurance

It is a condition of your booking with Equus Journeys that you have travel insurance which covers you for the riding activities to be undertaken. Your travel insurance should cover you for medical expenses and repatriation. Your guides will require your travel insurance details before they allow you to ride and may refuse to let you ride if you cannot provide them. You should take your insurance documents with you.

Budget and money

Britain’s currency is the pound sterling (£), which is divided into 100 pence (p).
Scotland has its own pound sterling notes. These represent the same value as an English note and can be used elsewhere in Britain. The Scottish £1 note is not accepted outside Scotland.
There are lots of bureaux de change in Britain – often located inside:
• banks
• travel agents
• Post Offices
• airports
• major train stations.
It's worth shopping around to get the best deal and remember to ask how much commission is charged.
Read more at https://www.visitbritain.com/gb/en/plan-your-trip/dinero-en-gran-bretana/moneda#C1qUYcFFUI93qfRV.99

Country information

Socio-economical data

Area total 242,495 km2
Population (2016 estimate) 65,648,000 (22nd)
GDP (PPP) (2016 estimate) $2.79 trillion (9th)
Per capita $42,514 (25th)

History

The origins of the United Kingdom can be traced to the time of the Anglo-Saxon king Athelstan, who in the early 10th century ce secured the allegiance of neighbouring Celtic kingdoms and became “the first to rule what previously many kings shared between them,” in the words of a contemporary chronicle. Through subsequent conquest over the following centuries, kingdoms lying farther afield came under English dominion. Wales, a congeries of Celtic kingdoms lying in Great Britain’s southwest, was formally united with England by the Acts of Union of 1536 and 1542. Scotland, ruled from London since 1603, formally was joined with England and Wales in 1707 to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain. (The adjective “British” came into use at this time to refer to all the kingdom’s peoples.) Ireland came under English control during the 1600s and was formally united with Great Britain through the Act of Union of 1800. The republic of Ireland gained its independence in 1922, but six of Ulster’s nine counties remained part of the United Kingdom as Northern Ireland. Relations between these constituent states and England have been marked by controversy and, at times, open rebellion and even warfare. These tensions relaxed somewhat during the late 20th century, when devolved assemblies were introduced in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Nonetheless, even with the establishment of a power-sharing assembly after referenda in both Northern Ireland and the Irish republic, relations between Northern Ireland’s unionists (who favour continued British sovereignty over Northern Ireland) and nationalists (who favour unification with the republic of Ireland) remained tense into the 21st century.

https://www.britannica.com/place/United-Kingdom

Geography

United Kingdom, island country located off the northwestern coast of mainland Europe. The United Kingdom comprises the whole of the island of Great Britain—which contains England, Wales, and Scotland—as well as the northern portion of the island of Ireland. The name Britain is sometimes used to refer to the United Kingdom as a whole. The capital is London, which is among the world’s leading commercial, financial, and cultural centres. Other major cities include Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester in England, Belfast and Londonderry in Northern Ireland, Edinburgh and Glasgow in Scotland, and Swansea and Cardiff in Wales.

https://www.britannica.com/place/United-Kingdom